Will A Motorcycle Run Without A Battery? Quick Answer


A motorcycle battery is an important part of the motorcycle as it stores electrical energy that can be used to start the motorcycle. The battery also serves as a buffer for the electrical energy that the motorcycle utilizes.

A motorcycle can be powered up without a battery, but it’s not a sustainable solution to keep it running for a long period of time. The general rule is, the smaller the motorcycle, the higher the chances of it running without a battery. Smaller models of around 250 CCs can run without a battery if there is a kickstarter. Larger models can’t run without a battery because they require so much more power to operate.

There are also other factors that will affect the feasibility, particularly the make and model of the motorcycle. At the end of the day, a motorcycle battery is still a crucial part of the motorcycle.

Should You Start A Motorcycle Without A Battery?

It is actually possible to customize your bike to a point where a motorcycle battery is no longer necessary. There are a couple of things you should consider before doing so.

Generally speaking, it’s not advisable to get rid of the motorcycle battery unless it’s an emergency. The only time you should ride a motorcycle that has no battery is if that is the last resort. For example, you can do this if you need to bring the motorcycle in for battery replacement. It’s not advisable to go for full trips and lengthy rides without a motorcycle battery.

A motorcycle battery makes a motorcycle safer for the rider. As aforementioned, it acts as a buffer. It is also the primary energy source of the motorcycle. If there is no buffer between the engine and the rest of the motorcycle. It moderates the energy flow to prevent overheating or overriding circuits. It also allows you to have better control over your motorcycle because there will be no sudden influx of electricity.

How To Start A Motorcycle Without A Battery

There may be instances where you will need to start your motorcycle even if it has no motorcycle battery. Your motorcycle battery can suddenly die which can leave you stranded in the middle of nowhere. Knowing how to do an emergency jumpstart is a handy skill for every motorcycle rider.

Preparation

Start by ensuring that the motorcycle is completely turned off and is in neutral mode. Locate the terminals located on the motorcycle battery. Most motorcycle batteries are located under the seat of the motorcycle. The location varies from model to model.

Connect Jumper Cables

The jumper cables will be used to jump start the dead battery for one last push. Take the red one and clip it on the positive terminal. Attach the negative side to the black cable. Connect the positive ends to the positive terminal of a portable jump starter pack. The opposing negative cable should be clipped to the metal surface of the motorcycle. This prevents further damage to the battery.

Power It Up

Turn on the portable jump starter pack. Set it to the correct voltage that corresponds to your motorcycle battery. For example, it should be set to twelve volts if your motorcycle battery is also at twelve volts.

men sunset motorcycle

Start The Motorcycle

Now, it is time to activate your motorcycle. It is important to go about this gradually and carefully to allow the electric current to fully disseminate throughout the battery cells.

Start the engine. Crank it for about two to three seconds at a time only. Portable jump starter packs deliver maximum power in short bursts so the gradual warm up will prevent your motorcycle battery from getting overcharged and getting damaged.

Once your motorcycle is already running smoothly, it is safe to turn off the jump starter pack and remove the cables. This is a handy tool for lone riders and long trips. It will revive your motorcycle battery in an instant so that you can have enough power to go to a nearby motorcycle shop and have it replaced.

Signs To Change The Motorcycle Battery

Changing the motorcycle battery should be part of your motorcycle maintenance routine. The first step is knowing the different signs that you should do so.

Difficulty Starting

One of the most common signs to change your motorcycle battery is if it is no longer easy to start your motorcycle. It might take you a few kicks before you can power up the engine. This should not be the case and this is usually a good indicator that your battery is running low on power.

Dimmed Lights And Faded Horns

The lights and hons are very important as they are your primary means of communication with the other riders on the road. They are affected if your battery is failing. The lights will no longer be as bright and the horn sound may not sound as sharp. These side effects are dangerous because they can limit your visibility on the road and impact the way you communicate.

engine close up bike

Check The Battery

One sure way to determine if it is time for a motorcycle battery upgrade is by checking the battery itself. Before proceeding, keep in mind that you are dealing with electrical currents. It’s important to stay away from conductive surfaces such as the metal parts of the motorcycle. Keep your work area dry because water and other fluids are great conductors, too. Wear safety gloves to prevent getting electrocuted.

Take a voltmeter or a multimeter. These devices are used to measure the amount of voltage that is available in the battery. The reading should say at least twelve volts, which is the minimum for motorcycle batteries.

Keep in mind that an unstable reading also indicates a faulty motorcycle battery. If the reading comes back inconsistent, take it as a sign that it’s time for an upgrade. The energy fluctuations will just cause more problems in the long run which can even result in motorcycle accidents.

3 Best Type of Motorcycle Batteries

iGel Battery

Lead Acid Battery

Absorbed Glass Mat

  • High Performance
  • Maintenance Free
  • Smart Technology
  • Easy application
  • Rechargeable

  • Rechargeable
  • Versatile Fit
  • Easy application
  • Top Technology
  • Lightweight
 

  • Rechargeable
  • Sealed Absorbed Glass Mat
  • Zipp Battery
  • Gel Electrolytes Technology
  • Maintenance Free

 

 
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Charles Mariotti

Charles came to motorcycling in his mid 20’s, getting his first street bike in 1993. When not writing or riding his bike, Charles works as a Heavy Duty Mechanic for a large motorcycle dealership. He is also passionate about photography and owns a Persian cat named Rider.

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